Building Experiences is the True Healthcare Revolution

Ours is an ambitious goal: to change the way we understand the relationship with health. We have already talked about our method inspired by design thinking and human-centered design, but the real question we want to answer now is “how do you want to revolutionize the whole healthcare sector?” There is not only one answer, but we have chosen to start from a simple concept: to draw experiences.

Define experiences

We could compare the experience to a journey. It all starts when the desire (or the necessity) begins and ends only once back home. What we live between these two moments will always remain in our memories and will define our expectations for subsequent journeys.

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Let’s think of another example that we touch every day: buy products online. The experience, in this case, begins with the manifestation of a need for a given product, has its peak at the moment when the courier rings at the door and ends only after advising (or advised against) the same product to others.

But what drives hospital space planners to choose a site rather than another are the actions that take place in the middle — the ease of finding what we need, the cheaper price, the best reviews, the fastest courier and so on. These micro-moments define whether our experience is to be repeated or just forgotten.

Building valuable experiences: our tools

Imagine applying this definition of expertise to patients in a clinic. How can we transform it to make it memorable? First, we must map it and fully understand the mechanisms that make it work.

To achieve this, we use a handy tool, the patient journey map. It is a visual representation of the actions performed by patients using a given healthcare service.

Then we identify the obstacles or development opportunities for each of these steps. In the same way, we build step by step the actions that the work team (doctors, nurses, and support staff) could undertake to improve the patient’s experience. By this method, we can provide our customers with a precise picture of the actions necessary to transform their business model in a genuinely human-centered way.

Not only. This approach allows us to respond to patients’ expectations, to involve them more, to make them feel unique and protected, and to increase their sense of satisfaction. In other words, making their experience memorable means turning them into ambassadors.

The real revolution done by hospital planners in India, the one that changes the approach to the Health system, is linked to a sixth issue that, in the light of what has been said, becomes fundamental and is the one that will make the difference in a value system based on value: it is the Relationship between patients, their families, and health professionals. The relationship must also be structured within the care pathways and how the latter must be analyzed and evaluated.

Do you want to transform the experience of your patients? Contact us, and we will work together to achieve your business goals.

Architecture for Health: Buildings that Heal

“The whole is better than the amount of its portions”; thus Aristotle abridged the bases of holism. It is about examining and considerate the systems as a combined and worldwide set that is, in short, going to establish the behavior of its diverse parts. But he does not believe that this “everything” is only a sum of its parts, but that the synergies between them achieve a much more complex system.

As such, architecture can, therefore, be integrated into a holistic system that tries to respond to different needs of the human being from different perspectives; but today, we want to highlight the concrete relationship of hospital architecture with holistic architecture. In this sense and from the point of view of psychology, Abraham Maslow already spoke of the satisfaction of the needs of his pyramid (physiological, security, social, recognition and self-realization) to achieve complete health, from the point of view of mental, emotional, physical and spiritual view.

Currently, medicine tends to be a holistic discipline, according to which the individual should be treated as a whole and provided with comprehensive health care related to physiology, biochemistry, nutrition, exercise, social relationships and also the habitat. Therefore, today, architecturally speaking, we tend to subscribe to this holistic commitment to health, seeking better visual and spatial quality and greater readability of hospital buildings that may be beneficial for patients.

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Healthcare architecture firms in India firmly trust that curing is possible, in part, through space. To attain an adequate space, we take into account the machinery that will be available, and we always seek the integration of natural light, chromatic and natural and green spaces, both inside the building and around it. The goal is always to improve user comfort. A good sanitary building is one in which the user feels that he is receiving the necessary care without perceiving that he is in a sanitary building”.

Once inside, the chromatic game that welcomes the patient will accompany him through the clinic, identifying each color with a specialty.

For us, scale, light or ventilation are basic elements, but in the well-being of a patient comfort and beauty are also fundamental. For a hospital to have the ability to heal it must be properly organized in architectural terms, but also, as we mentioned before, to be comfortable and to overcome the feeling of confinement that these buildings often cause.

From students, young aspiring architects are intimidated by their teachers when dealing with complex issues, such as prisons, social housing, and hospitals. More seductive are museums, theaters, and cultural centers, where the “artist” can give free rein to their creativity.

Buildings related to health, on the other hand, are among the most complex and technified, since their facilities, networks, special equipment, and spatial relationships must respond to precise requirements and to a host of restrictions that limit, or at least relegate to the background, the expressive value of the work.

However, the rejection that provokes this type of hospital space planning design rests fundamentally on the fear of the unknown and on simple prejudice. Beauty, in this case, is in the right way to respond to the problem; in contributing to the recovery of the patient.

On the other hand, it has been the same hospital architecture that has forgotten its user, in its human dimension, allowing machinist efficiency and procedural asepsis, end up eclipsing those fundamental aspects in the care of a patient, as is its assessment as an individual.